Translate

27.5.17

Steven Dutch suggested that the simpler belief system wins.
The convoluted it gets the less people go for it. This in fact seems to me to make sense. After all in Rome when there was competition between Christianity and the Roman gods, the simplest thing was to go with Christianity. Later on the was much effort put into showing how Christianity is reasonable --or at least defensible by some of the greatest minds of the Middle Ages. Later on Luther's ideas were also on the side of making things simple. Sola Scriptura is certainly on the side of making things reasonable and simple.

So what weakens Christianity today--if you go by this argument of Steven Dutch -is that it got to be too convoluted.
   
    Dear Dr Ross. I think that Feynman borrowed Hugen's principle to get his sum over histories approach. From what I recall It had to do with using the Lagrangian Action principle. That means he was looking at things from a wave point of view. So I I am unclear why the sum over histories implies a preference for particles a you mention in your article on Feynman.
    Sincerely Avraham Rosenblum.

Dear Dr Ross. It occurred to me a while ago that a you say Quantum Mechanics doe show that Kant was right. The way I wrote it down at the time was this. We know reality is local from GPS global positioning satellites. And we know from from Bell's inequality that reality is either non local or subjective. Therefore Reality is local and subjective. That would mean that the electron has no objective time or space position until it is measured. But as you pointed out universals are objective--like Schrodinger's equation.





Dear Mr. Rosenblum,
I think I still have a couple of letters from you queued for a response, but obviously it has been a while since I answered one.  A bit distracted this year.  The Rutgers philosophy department was so desperate for someone to each one of their classes this Spring that they gave it to me.  See the syllabus at http://www.friesian.com/rutgers/  It was great fun; but, even at only two days a week, it took a lot out of me.  I didn’t even make it into New York all semester.
I got the job in part by a recommendation from one of my old professors, Lenn Goodman.  But then I sat down to read Goodman’s new book on Judaism and found a sustained attack on Rudolf Otto, who of course is one of my Friesians.  So spent much of the semester writing a counterattack, which is at http://www.friesian.com/otto.htm#goodman  This provided an occasion to examine a number of things, especially in footnotes, and to look closely at some Biblical passages.  I was still working on some of it this morning.
      Dear Dr Ross. I think that Feynman borrowed Hugen's principle to get his sum over histories approach. From what I recall It had to do with using the Lagrangian Action principle. That means he was looking at things from a wave point of view. So I I am unclear why the sum over histories implies a preference for particles a you mention in your article on Feynman.
      Sincerely Avraham Rosenblum.
Feynman liked the least action principle, but the preference for particles was something that he expressed himself in QED.  I quote him saying “the wave theory collapsed.”  It didn’t, but Feynman had a little trouble sorting it out.  He knew better.
      I hope work on you book is coming along well.
The only book I have planned is about Rome.  I sent a proposal to Viking Press  at http://www.friesian.com/viking.htm -- but they never answered.  It is hard to work on a book without a commitment when I have quite enough writing to do with things I post immediately.  So I do that.  Rome and Romania is still the largest text file at the site:  http://www.friesian.com/romania.htm

      Dear Dr Ross. It occurred to me a while ago that a you say Quantum Mechanics doe show that Kant was right. The way I wrote it down at the time was this. We know reality is local from GPS global positioning satellites. And we know from from Bell's inequality that reality is either non local or subjective. Therefore Reality is local and subjective. That would mean that the electron has no objective time or space position until it is measured. But as you pointed out universals are objective--like Schrodinger's equation.
Bell’s Inequality shows that quantum mechanics is non-local, i.e. it ignores space.  This is conformable with Kant’s theory that space does not exist among things-in-themselves.  But phenomenal reality is spatial and not subjective.  Phenomenal objects, which are quite objective, occupy empirical reality.  I’m not sure what GPS has to do with it.
Best wishes,
Kelley Ross


      Avraham Rosenblum

24.5.17

  1. avraham rosenblum says:
    Nice essay. While not WASP myself I certainly appreciate, being a guest in WASP society and I am horrified at people that try to run it into the ground. That is not gratitude.
    • In WASP society, there is a long tradition of appreciation for guests who know how to be respectful visitors who strengthen their host culture, and this creates a mutually beneficial relationship. I remember one of my acquaintances in high school opining that this was possible for German Jews, but not for Eastern European ones. He was also one of the few who intuitively “got it” when I completely offended a teacher (but not the WASP students) by pointing out that Irish, Italians, Spaniards and Eastern Europeans were not “white,” which in a WASP context means WASP.
  2. avraham rosenblum says:
    WASP society at its best is based on good principles. That is to say there is a lot to criticize about the Reformation. In fact Luther was to a large a fairly bad man. Yet his religious convictions led him to some principles that in my mind correspond fairly well with objective morality. Calvin also was no saint. Yet still there is the basic structure of WASP society that comes in a straight line from Calvin –though in the USA tends to minimize the contribution of Calvin and instead give credit to John Locke. Not to disparage John Locke, but in the Calvin society was the germ and seeds of the USA.
    • Yet his religious convictions led him to some principles that in my mind correspond fairly well with objective morality.
      We should probably clarify “objective morality” here. I believe in no such thing, but instead, that each society determines the height to which it can rise (qualitative) by the morality it chooses.
      Not to disparage John Locke, but in the Calvin society was the germ and seeds of the USA.
      Interesting. Do you think Protestantism is inherently democratic?
      • avraham rosenblum says:
        I will have to do research on that. Weber already suggested it is inherent pro-work which may have led to Adam Smith’s labor theory of value–which he rejected but was embraced by Marx. But there very well might be that democratic element in Protestantism also. I am really not sure.
        • avraham rosenblum says:
          Your comment is awaiting moderation.
          Maybe you have to divide Protestantism into the two halves-Luther and Calvin. Calvin was undoubtedly the blueprint for the USA. Luther however not –as we know all too well.

23.5.17

WASP society at its best is based on good principles. That is to say there is a lot to criticize about the Reformation. In fact Luther was to a large a fairly bad man. Yet his religious convictions  led him to some principles that in my mind correspond fairly well with objective morality. Calvin also was no saint. Yet still there is the basic structure of WASP society that comes in a straight line from Calvin --though in the USA tends to minimize the contribution of Calvin and instead give credit to John Locke. Not to disparage John Locke, but in the Calvin society was the germ and seeds of the USA.

The Influence of Calvin and Luther affected the Jewish world also with the idea of Sola Scripture.  As that translated in the Jewish world that means the Oral and Written Law. That is a pretty good result to come out of the Reformation even though it was far from Luther's mind. Individualism also and freedom owe their prominence to Luther. --"No one can tell me what to believe." This got into everyone's mentality and comes solely from Luther.

20.5.17

I was looking at my notes on Bava Metzia and I realized that the small section I had written about an idea from the Musar Book Obligations of the Heart needs a bit of editing.
[The idea is that matter and form equal substance and accident.]]


The basic issues are too many to go into right now.




Just for my own sake, I need to jot down some of the issues.



(1). I gave an answer to the question the third man that was asked by Aristotle and also Plato himself, based on an computer algorithm that I had seen on the internet. That is simply put: "the third man" is not a man. That is a good answer to some degree but it leaves me with wondering why then is a man considered a man because of his partaking of this form of man which is itself not a man?  That is my answer does not seem to answer the question but rather evade it.
[One could ask here the question that Hippolytus asks on Aristotle in book 7, but I am not sure how to deal with his question. That is mainly this: the animality as such does not exist so how can it be the motivating force that makes animals exist? The fact is Aristotle tries to avoid this by equating form with species not with Genus. But it also seems to be a good question. You could put it in this way. The individual animal depends on the form for its existence, but the form itself depends on each individual animal for its existence. So which one is it?




(2) Aristotle's' approach seems to be the source of this idea of the Obligations of the Heart in his book "The Metaphysics." There Aristotle equates substance with form. The trouble here is that this does not correspond to Aristotle's' Book the Categories where primary substance is the individual.
Also as was pointed out by a Marc Cohen, there is an essential conflict within the Metaphysics itself. Up until the later chapters Aristotle argues substance is a universal. Then at the end he argues forcefully against this. I asked Dr Kelley Ross about this and I forgot his answer.

(3) In my notes I give two separate answers for the Obligations of the Heart. One is that he simply means like Aristotle. The other is form+ matter= substance+accident. [Not that form equals substance.] But that is a different answer. And in any case it is hard to figure out what that could mean. How is matter just an accident?

(4) In my final answer there I go into the Kantian approach and bring a proof from the fact that Nature violates Bell's inequality. That seems like a good answer but goes with the idea that substance is essence, not that which survives under changes. That is Aristotle approach in fact and leaves out the need for time.

Hidden within all this is one remarkable point. That Bell's Inequality proves Kant. Reality is subjective.The electron has no objective time frame or space frame until it is measured.

The CCCP I remember had to ask the USA for grain. This resulted in a Russian anecdote. Khrushchev asked Kennedy: We seem to be having trouble producing enough grain to feed out people could you send some shipments? Kennedy: Sure thing! Khrushchev: We also seem to be having trouble with our tractors. Could you send over a few shipments of American made tractors? Kennedy: Definitely. Khrushchev: We also seem to be having trouble implement the perfect communist system. Perhaps you could send over some advisers to help us perfect an ideal Communist  society? 

19.5.17

The South [The Confederacy.] should be given a more respectable approach in American history books. I have very happy that at least in my history classes the emphasis was to learn original documents. For me this was my most difficult class but in spite of my not doing well I think i got a good impression of the issues involved.

I think since then American history has been slanted against the South.
A lot of how one's life goes depends on prior commitment. Ideally this should happen on the 13th birthday for boys and the 12th for girls.  The idea is to commit oneself to follow the Law of God the Written and Oral Law of Moses.
Another way of putting this to to follow God, the truth and the moral law. In any case, if one missed the chance to do that then, still every day at its beginning gives  new opportunity to do this. That means one can follow what he knows to be right of what people around him think is right.

Bob Dillon did this commitment type of thing and devoted himself to the prince of this world, which accounts for his success in this world.Often success in this world can be attributed to the person having made commitment to the prince of this world at a young age.  [Or the divinity that is found in this world--which is Satan.]

To some degree I think I made a good choice to try to find the "Truth" which at an early age. A bad decision was I think when I got married with Leah, that I did not make learning Torah the goal of our marriage. I think that that lack of commitment in the very beginning caused the problems that came later. Still I have never been able to get back to learning Torah as being the goal of life because of the kinds of people that populate that section of humanity.So my own doubts have lead to a lack of commitment. I found some compromise with the Rambam that as such that Physics and Metaphysics are part of that goal of learning Torah


My immediate motivation for this essay was that I noticed Bob Dillion's commitment to the Sitra Achra which gave him his success. Also I saw an essay on the problem in the Left of not making a distinction between means and ends. It hit me right then that that was something i should have done at the very beginning of my marriage.

Maybe I was myself confused about that issue. After all learning Torah as the goal does not really come up until Reb Haim from Voloshin. You just do not see it beforehand stressed in the same way. And that I think led to my own falling from that ideal.


17.5.17

I am still very impressed with many aspects of the USA. The STEM in the universities is great. Not just the great names Stanford, Cal Tech etc. But even the local community collages. The Renaissance fairs. Art is hard to tell except after a long time, but I think eventually some of the classic movies will merit to be classified as great art.–Ten Commandments for example. Last but not least, the USA just voted for Trump. How much better could you want things to be?
Darwin has nothing to do with German Idealism nor idealism proper. The above essay is very wrong about Kant. Intuition --give knowledge about phenomena but nothing  a priori. But we do have a priori knowledge. That is Kant's thesis. Not only do we have a priori but also synthetic a priori. That comes from a different faculty called reason. 
But because of  the regress of reason we still need justification and that Hegel says is a kind of source of knowledge called an infinite idea which I think means and an idea gotten after an infinite process of dialectics.